BlogWalker

Muddling through the blogosphere

January 13, 2008
by blogwalker
2 Comments

Describing Web 2.0 Possibilities

If YouTube required a written script, explanation, or augmentation to accompany each video, then for Cisco’s Human Network…

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/x60pWzJvb9Q" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

…I would recommend David Warlick’s post Is Pedogogy Getting in the Way of Learning?, which starts with a description of his morning’s conversation with colleagues across the nation and world as they use different technologies to connect and share. David also references a May 2006 post in which he sums up limited vs. unlimited education:

“…the point is this. Education, defined by it limits, required a curriculum that was packaged into products that could be easily used in the classroom. We used textbooks with scope and sequence, pacing guides, and a teacher’s guide with the answers.

Education, defined by it’s lack of limits, requires no such packaging. It’s based on experiences, tied to real-world, real-time information that spans the entire spectrum of media — crafted and facilitated by skilled teachers, who become more like tour guides than assembly-line workers.”

The good news is that almost two years later, I can scroll through my blogroll and Bloglines to find a growing number of classrooms in which

“the platform is a node on the global network; with text, audio, and video links to other uncountable nodes on the network; and the connections are real time and clickable, and tools are available to work and employ the content that flows through those connections; then the learning happens because learners have experienced personal connections — and they want to maintain those connections by feeding back their own value.”

David’s post also included a link to a great Skype conversation between Clay Burrell and Chris Craft that further complements the video and helps to make Web 2.0 potential more visible. So I’ve added a new category – Unlimited education – and a new lense for viewing 21st (or 20th) century curriculum.

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