BlogWalker

Muddling through the blogosphere

January 13, 2013
by blogwalker
0 comments

Google Teacher Academy Gem #3 – Google Cultural Institute

The Google Cultural Institute is a dynamic set of stunningly beautiful collections. The purpose of the Cultural Institute is to help preserve and promote culture online. Google has created this site

to provide a visually rich and interactive online experience for telling cultural stories in new ways. Discover exhibits by expert curators, find artifacts, view photographs, read original manuscripts, watch videos, and more.”

My introduction was through the Art Project. I’m sorry I didn’t make note of the Google curator who led us through the Google Hangout tour of beautiful works of art from museums around the world. I think I was too swept away by the possibilities of virtual museum tours for students.

The Art Project is just one component of the Cultural Institute. How about having at your fingertips the opportunity to  view a selection of books Nelson Mandela received both in prison and during his political career, including the inscriptions supporters wrote on the inside pages of the books. Or how about a visit to Anne Frank, her life, her diary, her legacy? Or the Fall of the Berlin Wall, revelation not revolution?

Thank you, Google, for your commitment to “building tools that make it simple to tell the stories of our diverse cultural heritage and make them accessible worldwide.”

January 5, 2013
by blogwalker
0 comments

Google Teacher Academy Gem #2 – Advanced search for primary sources

This post is a part of a continuing set of reflections on my favorite take-aways from my whirlwind two days at the December Google Teacher Academy in Mountain View.

Following Jennie Magiera’s introduction during the opening round of “Demo Slams” to the Chrome extension Webpage Screenshot, Mark Hammons stepped up to the mic and walked us through the steps of using Google’s Advanced News Search feature to locate amazing primary sources available through the News Archives, such as newspaper clippings from the 1860’s that reference Abraham Lincoln.  You will definitely want to share Mark’s video (below) with your history/social studies teachers.  A perfect exercise for meeting CCSS requirements to provide students with access to primary source documents! Thanks, Mark!

Oh, but wait…..there’s more to share on how to search the News Archives.  Dan Russell, Google’s Search King, just created Google News Archive …fast (see video below), with the invitation to share out with other teachers. Thanks, Dan, for a perfect clip to add to Mark’s. Google and Google leaders are simply amazing!

January 2, 2013
by blogwalker
5 Comments

Google Teacher Academy – Gem #1

I knew when I headed to Mountain View for my two days at the December Google Teacher Academy (GTA) that I would be in a continual state of amazement and that the two days would move at the speed of light. Four weeks later, with the distraction of the holidays over, I’m revisiting my notes and ready to start sharing my favorite GTA take-aways, one gem at a time.

Gem #1: Webpage Screenshot – Jennie Magiera, my fabulous team leader (of the fabulous Team Heinlein) jumped right into the opening round of “Demo Slams” with an introduction to the Chrome extension Webpage Screenshot. Richard Byrne (Free Technology for Teachers) has created a great video that explains the cool features of this free tool, including the option to capture an entire page, not just what’s showing on your screen.

I love the ability to edit the text in the screen capture (even though your edits do not impact the original web page).  What a great option for challenging students to question information or to kick-start a lively faculty meeting! Capturing a front page item from our local Sacramento Bee, for instance, and giving myself credit for the upcoming New Year’s fireworks celebration took less than a minute to capture, edit, and save.

I’ll be back tomorrow with a Google Search gem.

 

Skip to toolbar