BlogWalker

Muddling through the blogosphere

February 19, 2018
by blogwalker
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Two Reasons Why Teaching about Copyright Just Got Easier

“Great leaders give credit.” George Couros

If you consider teaching students about their intellectual property rights and responsibilities an essential component of a digital citizenship program, I’m with you. So thanks to a recent change by Google and a new Google Docs Add-On by teacher Brandon Dorman, we have two great items to spark discussions on copyright.

Item #1 – Google’s removal of the View Image button from image searches – Yes, there has been some public pushback over losing a super-fast way to view and copy an image. Personally, I am glad for the change since image searchers will now use the Visit Site button to view the actual hosting site for images. Although the Visit Site button was always there, image searchers could ignore it.

If you are not yet familiar with the Visit Site button, it is from the host site that you will find out exactly how the creator would like you to respect and/or attribute his/her work through Creative Commons licensing (see the video below for a Creative Commons introduction).

For those opposed to visiting the host site and viewing the creator’s licensing, there are already a number of workarounds available. I hope the workarounds do not deter image searchers from giving proper attribution to those who are freely sharing their creative work.

Item #2 – Former 7-12 math teacher’s Creative Commons Google Doc Add-On – The best way to bring students on board with respect for intellectual property is to have them create and share their own work. So I was delighted to learn about Brandon Dorman’s Creative Commons Google Doc Add-On, which makes choosing and adding CC licensing to a Google Doc a snap.

What would make this Add-On even better? I’d love it if it were included in the Google Docs Tools dropdown menu rather than as an Add-On. Due to the agree-to components of 3rd party Add-Ons (which legally equate to a contract), my district blocks student access to Add-Ons and extensions.

At this point, though, for students 13+, I would certainly encourage them to add Brandon’s Creative Commons licensing option to their personal Google accounts.

Note to Self: Need to head to Can I Use That? A Guide to Creative Commons and accompanying hyperdoc lesson and make updates to reflect the above items.

August 1, 2014
by blogwalker
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Getting Googley at Gunn High School – 2014 EdTechTeam Summit

The drive to Palo Alto’s Gunn High School to attend the July 19-20 GAFE Summit was definitely worth it! With so many great sessions to choose from, narrowing down my choices was a challenge. I enjoyed and learned from each one. Below are a few of my takeaways:

Toward Better Technology Integration – Scott McLeod – I’ve been following Scott McLeod, both through his blog and on Twitter, since first watching his Did You Know videos. A visit to his 2014 EdTech Summit Palo Alto page will provide you with a ton of cool resources as well as a window into his amazing session Toward Better Technology Integration (scroll down a ways). Because I was also presenting during session 1, I missed Part 1 of Scott’s presentation, but am very glad I made it to Part 2 – in which Scott walked us through trudacot (technology-rich unit design and classroom observation template).

Two weeks later, I am still thinking about the potential of trudacot to leverage the power of technology to power up a lesson or unit of study. The template moves beyond technology integration frameworks, such as TPACK and SAMR, by helping teachers figure how to redesign lessons so it’s not about the tool or tools; it’s about the learning. It’s also about providing the context to allow learning to become authentic. Students move beyond studying about “homelessness,” for instance, to figuring out solutions to homelessness (like PBL).

The starting point in redesigning lessons is to begin with someone else’s lessons. In grade-level teams, for example, once everyone is comfortable to with the trudacot model via practicing lesson upgrades (in both the lesson design and meaningful integration of technology tools) using “model lessons” such as the ones listed on Scott’s Summit page, they can move on to analyzing and improving their own lessons.  In watching the sample lesson videos and then reading through the accompanying lessons, it was easy/energizing to go through the trudacot sections and discuss how the lesson met or did not meet the criteria, and then move on to ideas for bumping up the lesson – and learning.

What a great coaching  model and mega takeaway!

Performing the Google SlideMark Hammons – Loved Mark’s design tips, including switching out bullet points for an image + powerful quote = telling a story. Very excited to start playing with Pear Deck and weaving it into my G Slides.

Doctopus and autoCratDiane Main – Great session, with lots of WOW factors in seeing what the new Doctopus add-on can do for you. Wish I had updated to the new Drive prior to Diane’s session, as the Doctopus add-on doesn’t really work in the old Drive.

Better Student Feedback with Kaizena Karl Lindgren-Streicher  – Love Karl’s presentation style: humor + insights from the trenches. His session link includes screenshots and tips to get started with this powerful Google add-on for providing students with audio feedback. In Karl’s words, “Kaizena allows you to give more, better, faster feedback on student work than any other tool.” Prior to Karl’s session, I’d thought of Kaizena more as a one-way flow of feedback – from teacher to student. I left the session thinking about the possibilities of two-way feedback/conversations. Awesome tool. Awesome presenter.

Critical Thinking and the Web: Searching in a Google-Infused WorldHolly Clark – I ended my Summit experience with Holly’s session on searching skills. Having Google Search Anthropologist Dan Russell join the session as a participant transformed the session from a presentation to a highly interactive discussion. WOW! Great way to wrap up an amazing two days of connecting, comparing/sharing, and learning!

A huge thank you to the EdTechTeam for all time, energy, and vision you put into planning this event! It was a privilege to attend, both as a presenter and a participant. I’m already checking the upcoming GAFE Summits and looking forward to attending several in the new school year.

February 16, 2014
by blogwalker
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Roseville GAFE Summit – Some Takeaways

resources   2014 07 19 EdTechTeam California Summit featuring Google for Education

 

A week later, I’m still thinking about the Roseville GAFE Summit. What an amazing gathering of innovative educators! Here are some of my takeaways:

 

  • Dan Russell’s Opening Keynote – I’m a huge Dan Russell fan. Many of the tips I include in my Just Google It! workshop come from Dan. From his session, I’ve added a new word to my 21st century teaching and learning glossary: informacy – to use and interact with the  information. I’m also adding to my workshop Dan’s reminder of the power of Photo search, which allows you to search by image  and then drag that image into search image box. Or even more awesome, take photo of something (e.g., a caterpillar) and drag image into search image box.
  • Ken Shelton’s Google Sites Session – Ken demonstrated how to make a Google site not look like a Google site by encouraging students to take advantage of screen real estate and switching  navigation from vertical to horizontal. His great tips for selecting or creating a color palette are posted to his Site Design[ed] site. Loved learning about ColourLovers.com and You’re a Comic Sans Criminal.
  • Trevor Mattea’s Digital Photography for Elementary Students – I recommend going through Trevor’s slideshow, including his external links, to find great tips such as Mike Browne’s YouTube Channel and to be inspired by the work Trevor is doing with his 3rd graders.
  • Michael Wacker’s Even More Googiciousness – Wow, so many Google tips, I need to go back through his slideshow a couple more times. Glad to learn about Remote Desktop, which allows you to take over another person’s computer during a hangout, and Auto Awesome – if you take 5 or more images, it creates the animate “chip” for you.
  • Rachel Wente-Chaney’s Trees & Branches – Wish you had an easy-to-follow video tutorial to walk staff and students through the process of of creating “choose your own adventure” style Google forms? Checkout the link to Rachel’s Trees & Branches “screencast walk through.”
  • Megan Ellis’s Doctopus & Goobric – Beautiful job of bringing a packed room of eager educators on board with the power of Doctopus and Goobric! (Very proud to have been in the same MERIT cohort with Megan;-)

Based on the Roseville Summit, I’m pretty sure I’m on my way to becoming a Google Summit groupie.

January 13, 2013
by blogwalker
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Google Teacher Academy Gem #3 – Google Cultural Institute

The Google Cultural Institute is a dynamic set of stunningly beautiful collections. The purpose of the Cultural Institute is to help preserve and promote culture online. Google has created this site

to provide a visually rich and interactive online experience for telling cultural stories in new ways. Discover exhibits by expert curators, find artifacts, view photographs, read original manuscripts, watch videos, and more.”

My introduction was through the Art Project. I’m sorry I didn’t make note of the Google curator who led us through the Google Hangout tour of beautiful works of art from museums around the world. I think I was too swept away by the possibilities of virtual museum tours for students.

The Art Project is just one component of the Cultural Institute. How about having at your fingertips the opportunity to  view a selection of books Nelson Mandela received both in prison and during his political career, including the inscriptions supporters wrote on the inside pages of the books. Or how about a visit to Anne Frank, her life, her diary, her legacy? Or the Fall of the Berlin Wall, revelation not revolution?

Thank you, Google, for your commitment to “building tools that make it simple to tell the stories of our diverse cultural heritage and make them accessible worldwide.”

January 5, 2013
by blogwalker
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Google Teacher Academy Gem #2 – Advanced search for primary sources

This post is a part of a continuing set of reflections on my favorite take-aways from my whirlwind two days at the December Google Teacher Academy in Mountain View.

Following Jennie Magiera’s introduction during the opening round of “Demo Slams” to the Chrome extension Webpage Screenshot, Mark Hammons stepped up to the mic and walked us through the steps of using Google’s Advanced News Search feature to locate amazing primary sources available through the News Archives, such as newspaper clippings from the 1860’s that reference Abraham Lincoln.  You will definitely want to share Mark’s video (below) with your history/social studies teachers.  A perfect exercise for meeting CCSS requirements to provide students with access to primary source documents! Thanks, Mark!

Oh, but wait…..there’s more to share on how to search the News Archives.  Dan Russell, Google’s Search King, just created Google News Archive …fast (see video below), with the invitation to share out with other teachers. Thanks, Dan, for a perfect clip to add to Mark’s. Google and Google leaders are simply amazing!

January 2, 2013
by blogwalker
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Google Teacher Academy – Gem #1

I knew when I headed to Mountain View for my two days at the December Google Teacher Academy (GTA) that I would be in a continual state of amazement and that the two days would move at the speed of light. Four weeks later, with the distraction of the holidays over, I’m revisiting my notes and ready to start sharing my favorite GTA take-aways, one gem at a time.

Gem #1: Webpage Screenshot – Jennie Magiera, my fabulous team leader (of the fabulous Team Heinlein) jumped right into the opening round of “Demo Slams” with an introduction to the Chrome extension Webpage Screenshot. Richard Byrne (Free Technology for Teachers) has created a great video that explains the cool features of this free tool, including the option to capture an entire page, not just what’s showing on your screen.

I love the ability to edit the text in the screen capture (even though your edits do not impact the original web page).  What a great option for challenging students to question information or to kick-start a lively faculty meeting! Capturing a front page item from our local Sacramento Bee, for instance, and giving myself credit for the upcoming New Year’s fireworks celebration took less than a minute to capture, edit, and save.

I’ll be back tomorrow with a Google Search gem.

 

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